Checking in! (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 6 Initial Post)

Questions:

  1. Should people be politically correct on the web, or does this limit capabilities for satire?
  2. How would online interactions change if all individuals online were digitally labeled with their gender?

Status:

I’m currently reviewing and searching for sources to connect my ideas. I’m thinking to formulate a conclusion on how the 4chan community and the group Anonymous relate to one another and how their relationship relates to online identity.

Riding the Grass-Mud Horse Into the Sunset (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 5 Final Post)

CRAAP Analysis:

Online Academic Journal: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/3665/305

Currency: 2 points – Published on October 3, 2011. It’s fairly recent, within 4 years.

Relevance: 2 points – It isn’t all encompassing, but addresses one part to the two parts of my topic thoroughly.

Authority: 3 points – Author is Lee Knuttila. Has a Ph.D. in media studies and works with/at York University.

Accuracy: 3 points – Long list of well cited references at the bottom.

Purpose: 3 points – It is scholarly and written as such, in order to inform.

Continue reading Riding the Grass-Mud Horse Into the Sunset (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 5 Final Post)

Geili! (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 5 Initial Post)

The Grass-Mud Horse

The effects of internet satire in China are evident. It builds a community, one with an identity – Netizens. The internet allows these Chinese bloggers to assemble in a safe way and spread satire about their government, a strong mechanism of change. Though it is a new comunitty, and rapidly changing, the effects of this satire is evident in the way the Chinese people  are able to influence their government using it. Simply by posting outrage, Netizens were able to raise the compensation for the families victim to the train crash. Also, the ongoing fight for Netizen censorship by the government shows their apprehension about the spreading of satirical ideas, which are those that point out flaws in the government, and, ultimately, call for change.

Continue reading Geili! (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 5 Initial Post)

4Chan and the Group “Anonymous” (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 4 Final Post)

Final Choice for Research Topic:

The origins of the the “hacktivist” group Anonymous on the image board site 4chan, and it’s relation to identity.

“Anonymous (used as a mass noun) is a loosely associated international network of activist and hacktivist entities.”

(Related site 1)

“4chan is an English-language imageboard website. Users generally post anonymously, with the most recent posts appearing above the rest. 4chan is split into various boards with their own specific content and guidelines. Registration is not required, nor is it possible (except for staff).”

(Related site 2)

This topic seems like a really good fit to my interests. I appreciate some aspects of the 4chan culture (though I’m not a user) and the range of simply funny things it can produce. I’m also planning to major in computer science, and, perhaps, become cyber security certified. This would delve into territory of ethical hacking. Thus, a combination of these two personal interests, one seemingly fun and the other serious, comprise this topic.

Continue reading 4Chan and the Group “Anonymous” (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 4 Final Post)

Scientific Stalking: Twee-Q Analysis (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 4 Initial Post)

The site Twee-Q analyzes the the ratio of an account’s re-tweets from female to male accounts.

http://www.twee-q.com/

 

This is a strange website. It doesn’t only make this analysis, but gives you an option to tweet it! This analysis seems harmless at face value, but could be potentially embarrassing information. It insinuates that the bearer of the account has a gender bias in who they re-tweet. This could cause jealousy or other sorts of “political” situations.

Continue reading Scientific Stalking: Twee-Q Analysis (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 4 Initial Post)

Online Trolling Reflection (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 3 Final Post)

Final Thoughts:

I’ve had time to ponder my question: “should people be politically correct on the web, or does this limit capabilities for satire?” Upon reflection, I see the “should” part of that question is counter productive – it reaches for an opinion. The fact of the matter is satire on the web serves a valid purpose whether it is hurtful or not. Should people be politically correct? Of course. Will this also limit capacity to point out flaws in today’s debates? Of course.

Continue reading Online Trolling Reflection (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 3 Final Post)

Online Trolling (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 3 Initial Post)

Consider the following:

(http://twentytwo.fibreculturejournal.org/fcj-159-black-up-what-trolls-can-teach-us-about-race/)

“‘People who are overly earnest and serious online deserve and need a corrective. I started [trolling] because there was no way to have rational conversations with some people and because I like to debate things. But there’s also a time to just say, You are an idiot, which is the most basic, entry level of trolling and most honest people will admit they have done it. (Phillips, 2012)’

As Sarkeesian’s case illustrates, ‘overly serious’ is often code for ‘politically correct’ which in turn is code for anti-sexist, anti-homophobic, anti-racist.”

 

This is an interesting statement. Most would think a person should maintain their composure in every situation and every platform in life, but there could be advantages to being a sort of digital/technological “troll” on the internet. Should people be politically correct on the web, or does this limit  capabilities for satire?

Continue reading Online Trolling (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie – Week 3 Initial Post)

Meadows to media: Week 2 conclusion (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie Week 2 Final Post)

In class we started a google slide where we could share our work and data. We ran through  many ideas on who we would “follow” as we described building identity in 2005. We came up with many examples, including a college girl, Kanye West, and someone who got their identity stolen due to their lack of online security.

Continue reading Meadows to media: Week 2 conclusion (FSEM: Beyond the Selfie Week 2 Final Post)

From Meadows to Media: Identity Through Time (Beyond the Selfie – Week 2 Initial Post)

Promt: Using the readings and other sources create a blog post discussing ways/tools/choices that you would have to construct your identity if you were 18 in 1705, 1805, 1905, 2005.

 

1705: Letters, journals, and newspapers – private – america founded in 1776

1805: Newspapers and ads – local – industrial revolution

1905: Radio, television in 1920’s – wide – progressive era

2005: Professional references and internships, social media websites on internet – global – digital

 

Giving a depiction of the time around 1705, it was a time still ruled by monarchs, considering America became independent in 1776. Establishing of identity had nearly a private scope. Word got around by mouth, letters, journals, and newspapers. Much identity was established through interaction alone. A young boy during this time period would have little to no identity, considering politics were the defining characteristic of this century. He would only be known through his job or work on family agriculture.

Continue reading From Meadows to Media: Identity Through Time (Beyond the Selfie – Week 2 Initial Post)